Jesus Be the Centre

Saw an article arguing against a “Christ-Centred” or “Gospel-Centred” theology. The writer is of the opinion that an over-emphasis on Christ is too “one-sided”, and fails to “give glory” (whatever that means) to the other 2 Persons of the Trinity.

But is that so?

1) Whoever denies the Son does not have the Father either; he who acknowledges the Son has the Father also. (1 John 2:23)

Jesus declared the only way to the Father is through the Son and only by acknowledging the Son will we have the Father. So that being the case, how can we ever avoid a Christ-Centred theology?

2) For in Him all the fullness of Deity (the Godhead) dwells in bodily form [completely expressing the divine essence of God]. (Colossians 2:9 AMP)

Paul said the whole fullness of the Godhead (which also include the Father and Holy Sprit ) is in Christ. So why would a Christ-Centred theology somehow not glorified the other 2 Persons of the Trinity?

3) But when the Helper (the Holy Spirit) comes, whom I shall send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth who proceeds from the Father, He will testify of Me (Jesus).” (John 15:26)

The primary purpose of the Holy Spirit is to testify of Jesus. So can we say the Holy Spirit is being too “Christ-Centred” and thus “one-sided”?

4) Then beginning with Moses and [throughout] all the Prophets, He went on explaining and interpreting to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning and referring to Himself. (Luke 24:27 AMP)

On the Road to Emmaus, who did Jesus spent all the time talking about? So can we say that He was not glorifying His Father by focusing too much on Himself??

5) While he was still speaking, a bright cloud covered them, and a voice from the cloud said, “This is my Son, whom I love; with Him I am well pleased. Listen to Him!” (Matthew 17:5)

On the Mount of Transfiguration, the Father commanded the 3 disciples (Peter, James and John) to listen to the Son whom He loves. So should why should we speak less about the Son when the Father is pleased to let Him take the centre-stage?

For the life of me, I just could not see why people want to make a distinction between a Christ-Centred and God-Centred theology when Christ is the message God wants us to preach.

 

I suppose the assumption is that in a Christ-Centred theology, we will be talking exclusively about Jesus Christ and makes no mention of the Father and the Holy Spirit, but is that even possible if one is truly preaching the whole counsel of God?

IMO, the problem is never about having too much Christ. Instead, problems will arise when there is too little of Christ. After all, it will be the spirit of anti-Christ (1 John 4:3) in the end times.

*After I re-posted this on my FB, 2 of my friends contributed 2 more verses which I shall add in here.

For in him (Jesus) all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created through him and for him. He is before all things, and in him all things hold together. (Colossians 1:16-17 NIV)

If all things were created through Him and for Him, how can we not talk about the Lord of all creation, in whom we find the purpose of our existence?

Moreover, the Father judges no one, but has entrusted all judgment to the Son, that all may honor the Son just as they honor the Father. Whoever does not honor the Son does not honor the Father, who sent him. (John 5:22-23 NIV)

In short, it means everything the Son says or does is exactly what the Father would say or do. So isn’t Christ-Centred really just God-Centred?*

trinity_diagram

The Trinity Diagram

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